The University of Liège receives funding from the Interreg V-A programme (Greater Region) for the development of new bioMaterials for PROliferation and in vitro Expansion of STEM cells (Improve-Stem)

The University of Liège receives funding from the Interreg V-A programme (Greater Region) for the development of new bioMaterials for PROliferation and in vitro Expansion of STEM cells (Improve-Stem)

The Laboratory of Chemical Engineering (Pr. D. TOYE) and the Interfaculty Center for Biomaterials (C. GRANDFILS) from the University of Liège together with the University of Kaiserslautern, the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), the Leibniz Institute for New Materials (INM), the University of Lorraine and the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) bring up keys competencies in materials sciences, bioprocess engineering and cell biology.

At the level of the Greater Region, this multidisciplinary consortium provides a solid basis for a platform of excellence in the field of mesenchymal stem cells culture.

Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells are multipotent cells, self-renewable, easily accessible and culturally expandable in vitro with exceptional genomic stability and few ethical issues, marking its importance in cell therapy, regenerative medicine and tissue repairmen (1). However, one of the main limiting steps in their clinical use is the amplification step.

MSC expansion on microcarriers has emerged during the last few years, fulfilling the lack of classical T-flasks expansion.

The aim of the project Improve-Stem is to develop new microcarriers with optimized surface design allowing the control of cell adhesion alongside to the design of an adapted bioreactor with operating conditions adjusted for stem cell culture on microcarriers.

About INTERREG V-A programme

The INTERREG V-A programme in the Greater Region aims at intensifying cross-border cooperation. This goal is to be achieved by means of local and regional projects between partners from the various areas in the Greater Region.

This programme is cofounded by European Union (Fonds Européen de Développement Régional)

1.Horwitz E.M., Le Blanc K., Dominici M., Mueller I., Slaper-Cortenbach I., Marini F.C., Deans R.J., Krause D.S., Keating A. International Society for Cellular Therapy. Clarification of the nomenclature for MSC: The International Society for Cellular Therapy position statement. Cytotherapy. 2005;7:393–395. doi: 10.1080/14653240500319234
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